Tuesday, October 23, 2012

Former assistant career services director admits to falsifying employment data, claims she was ordered to do so



A former assistant career services director at Thomas Jefferson School of Law has admitted in a sworn statement to fabricating graduate employment data, and claims she was ordered to do so by her boss, the director of the of the office.  Law School Transparency broke the story this afternoon:

Grant alleges that her fraud was part of a deliberate scheme by the law school’s administration to inflate its employment statistics. She also claims that her direct supervisor, Laura Weseley, former Director of Career Services, instructed her on multiple occasions to improperly record graduate employment outcomes and justified the scheme because “everybody does it” thus “it is no big deal.” TJSL could face sanctions from the American Bar Association as severe as losing accreditation.
Grant was Assistant Director of Career Services at TJSL from September 2006 to September 2007, during which she was tasked with tracking and recording employment outcomes of recent graduates. Grant is a licensed California attorney and made her sworn declaration on August 2, 2012 in connection to the class action lawsuit filed by Anna Alaburda, et al. against TJSL in 2011. (Complaint; Original Story.)

Specifically, Grant admits that she “routinely recorded currently unemployed students as ‘employed’ if they had been employed at any time since graduation,” which is a violation of both ABA and NALP reporting guidelines. Graduates should only be recorded as employed if they are employed as of February 15. 
 
TJSL denies both Grant’s allegation that she was ordered to falsify data, and that the data Grant submitted were false.  In an email to LST, Rudy Hasl, the school’s dean, also questioned Grant’s motivations:

“The law school stands behind the accuracy of the data that we submitted to the American Bar Association.” Sources report that Grant was terminated in 2007, though when asked for clarification, Dean Hasl would not comment on internal personnel matters beyond suggesting that LST “do a due diligence analysis … including the reasons for her departure from the School of Law.”
I’ll have more on this story shortly.

130 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Go read the original document that's posted at ATL. It's but a fraction as damaging as implied by Campos above. To be honest, not sure if he's even read it!

      Delete
    2. "Dean Hasl would not comment on internal personnel matters beyond suggesting that LST "do a due diligence analysis … including the reasons for her departure from the School of Law.'"

      Sadly, after reading the actual document, it does read like a disgruntled employee and a plaintiff's attorney grasping at straws.

      This might be the first non-lie that Dean Hasl has told in the past decade.

      Delete
    3. @5:09.

      Delete
    4. Spin, baby, spin! @ 5:05/5:39.

      Why do I have a feeling that nobody will agree with you (aside from an anonymous law professor posting in the comments on taxprof's blog)? Why isn't anyone publicly defending the honest and legitimate actions of law schools?

      Delete
    5. Because they know that there aren't legitimate actions?

      Delete
  2. Don't worry -- the ABA assures us that this is an isolated incident ("The actions of a few schools have called into question the integrity of all.").

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think the phrase they're looking for is "a few bad apples."

      Delete
    2. The ABA should revoke its accreditation to show that the ABA isn't a complete a joke.

      Delete
    3. It's like what they say about lawyers. It's really only 95% of them that give the rest of us a bad name.

      Delete
  3. Federal Judge Gordon Quist already ruled on this issue when he dismissed the lawsuit against Cooley. The employment numbers were "inherently untrustworthy". I'm sure the same opinion would be offered in this instance.

    This admission of fabricating employment statistics doesn't matter if they are "inherently untrustworthy". At least if there are no legal repercussions, there will hopefully be some in the court of public opinion.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Fraud in no longer a crime?

      Delete
    2. "Fraud in no longer a crime?"

      When conducted by the elites, no.

      Delete
    3. Even with rotten judges (particularly *stupid* rotten judges who explicitly make statements 90% of the population are likely to find immoral, if not "illegal") *getting the word out* is far beyond the control of the self-serving legal elites these days.

      Witness this (and many other) blogs and the increasing number of stories in the mainstream press.

      Keep the pressure on by blogging, emailing, participating in online discussion groups, etc.

      *None* of those require the assistance of any elite - and they will incrementally tear down the law school charnel houses.

      Delete
    4. Has anybody posted the Quist-ling opinion in a permanent spot online?

      Referencing the "inherently untrustworthy" language will dissuade thousands more applicants to attend, infinitely faster, than any fully litigated case could ever do.

      How about posting it here, LawProf?

      Delete
    5. "Fraud in no longer a crime?"

      Not unless a gun is/was/has been held to someone's head. - Jack Marshall of ethicsalarms.com

      Awesome site, Jack Marshall of ethicsalarms.com !

      Delete
  4. Dean Hasl: I can't comment on personnel matters, but you really should look into why she was fired, nudge nudge, because the reason bears directly on her credibility, wink nudge, and that's all I'm allowed to say because I'm so very ethical.

    This story goes on a few more days, and he'll be calling her a slut.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In other words, "I'm in the ivory tower and thus am as pure as the fresh fallen snow. Whereas this "disgruntled" employee just wants revenge for an incident that I'm not at liberty to discuss right now. But trust me, she's unreliable."

      Total garbage from the scammers!!!

      Delete
  5. This does fit in with Quist's opinion stating that the numbers are inherently untrustworthy. Also Neil Cohen's opinion stating that the numbers from DePaul were, as LawProf would put it, too fraudulent to defraud a reasonable person.

    Barry--you are correct, there is a different standard for those who run things. The people in power are the ones profiting from this scam. The judges will not allow these lawsuits to go forward because it is not just one or two involved in the scam--they all are.

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  6. How nice that he stands by the data. It should be a simple matter to verify those data: just get the names of the graduates and check records to see whether they were indeed employed as of February 15.

    ReplyDelete
  7. What will happen, I'm guessing, is there will be a negligible settlement with no admission of guilt or wrongdoing. The world moves on LS train continues until the brakes fall off.

    ReplyDelete
  8. No this is big. I don't know how it will effect the cases, but many are being appealed. It certainly isn't favorable to the law schools.

    ReplyDelete
  9. No, this is wonderful. Why? Because now every school's defense will not be "We're just doing what every other law school did, and does." It will be, "We are not like that other law school who lied to its students."

    Why is that better? Because it parallels the slow transition from "Everybody's better off with a JD no matter what" to "We are providing value to our students, not like that other school/those other schools/90% of American law schools," and hopefully soon "We can't promise any of you jobs in the law, and historically a third to a half of any graduating class won't get them."

    ReplyDelete
  10. And people got upset when the scambloggers initially said that the law school cockroaches manipulated employment placement data.

    THANK YOU!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, it's all about you.

      Delete
    2. I mentioned all of the scambloggers. Learn how to read. It might come in handy one day, when you decide to take a job that does not entail cleaning bathrooms.

      Delete
    3. We all hate Nando - his poop pictures are over the top!

      Less poop and, please, more bullshit "philosophy" from the legal "academy" that no one gives a shit about.

      Delete
  11. The San Diego Superior Court Judge hearing this case, Joel Pressman, has made it clear that he is not going to be swayed by out-of-jurisdiction rulings on similar lawsuits. TJSL filed a Motion to Dismiss the case ("demurrer") and it was made clear to them that the motion was not well taken. They took it off-calendar and the case proceeded to discovery.

    He is doing what the other judges who dismissed the cases SHOULD have done; let the case proceed to discovery, build up the record for an appeal, and send the case up to the appellate courts for determination, with the fully developed record.

    TJSL has a beautiful new campus in San Diego's trendy East Village neighborhood. This development makes it quite a bit more likely that the campus will be converted into condominiums in the foreseeable future.

    ReplyDelete
  12. BOOYA!!!

    --exposing the law school scam!

    ReplyDelete
  13. How do you pronounce that name?October 23, 2012 at 12:20 PM

    "She also claims that her direct supervisor, Laura Weseley, former Director of Career Services, instructed her on multiple occasions to improperly record graduate employment outcomes"


    It would just be too, too fitting is Ms. Weseley's name is pronounced with a long-E sound on that first E.

    Not likely it is, but it would be fantastic if true.

    ReplyDelete
  14. "Federal Judge Gordon Quist already ruled on this issue when he dismissed the lawsuit against Cooley. The employment numbers were "inherently untrustworthy". I'm sure the same opinion would be offered in this instance."

    Good point.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. No, because the case proceeding against TJ has some additional angles to it based on that state's laws. So the judge there has decided not to dismiss and it is in discovery.

      Delete
    2. 12:23 keep shitting your pants. This won't go on forever.

      Delete
    3. The Cooley decision was garbage. The Judge failed to explain why a macrocosm of the job market in general is or should be the same as the microcosm of graduates from one school in particular. Is the job market the same for Yale grads as TJLS grads? No. And the only institution possessed of the microcosm information, was the lying liars who possessed it and chose to publish it. Personally, I think it's a very strong argument that people don't routinely sign up to get sodomized, so to speak, by a raw deal. That argument gets used in commercial litigation at least in concept: unconscionability, or lack of informed consent in the medical malpractice context.

      Delete
  15. somebody go make a recommendation to the LST story on TJSL's official FB page

    https://www.facebook.com/officialtjsl?fref=ts

    ReplyDelete
  16. "Say it ain't so, Joan."

    ReplyDelete
  17. It would be better if multiple people made (and kept making as they are erased), a link on the FB page.

    ReplyDelete
  18. "You can't put the toothpaste back in the tube." - H.R. Haldeman

    ReplyDelete
  19. Don't worry, TJSL grads about some employment numbers we made up, you can still succeed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=yW1_hoIBqM4

    ReplyDelete
  20. The Michigan and New York opinions were poorly reasoned, though I think they'll be affirmed.
    The unstated subtext in both was standard, misplaced baby boomer nonsense: "I made it, but your generation wants a handout." No, we just want accurate information from those more able to produce it, at a lower cost, before we borrow over $120,000 to go to school. That, my friends, is the crux of it.



    ReplyDelete
  21. Unfortunately this kind of a post is too real for most of the avid commenters on this blog, and who are mostly cowardly and anon.

    And so they will hide out until the reality of the whole situation subsides and they can all go back to commenting from a telescopic distance.

    Such is the nature of hypocrisy,

    I predict less than forty comments for this post. Give or take.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Johnnie, we hardly knew ye (or wanted to)October 23, 2012 at 5:38 PM

      @3:36, go away John. Stand by your word.

      Delete
    2. "...too real for most of the avid commenters on this blog, and who are mostly cowardly and anon."

      As opposed to the irregular, law professor commenters on this blog - brave and always "owning their words"?

      Delete
    3. What does that even mean? What is too real?

      Delete
    4. He's just jealous of all the page views this blog gets. Also, lol @ 45 posts or less. GUESS WHO'S WRONG??

      Delete
  22. Er, has anyone actually read this document?

    Because for all the sensationalism in this post, it's actually a document that says rather little and is open to huge amounts of interpretation. For anyone actually interested in making their own mind up, rather than just buying into the headline on this blog, the full document, plus the attached evidence of a scam, is posted over at Above The Law.

    Remember that this is just the plaintiff's (favorable) interpretation of what sounds like a slightly disgruntled former employee's take on the situation. I mean, the interpretation of the email about "interfering with the numbers" is overreaching, and the "notes" aren't much better. And the document as a whole says remarkably little, and is actually nothing like as destructive and revealing as described herein.

    Is that really the best they could dig up? Because if so, it's one hell of a weak case.

    Sorry to disappoint, but if something this insignificant makes the entire movement (or this blog at least, along with LST) blow up in a frenzy of "Oh My God It's Really True!", then something is wrong.

    Nothing to see here. Move along.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Did you miss the part where the staffer said, "I lied about employment data" or are you Dean Hasl?

      Delete
    2. Hi, Joan King!

      Delete
    3. Spin, Baby, SPIN!!October 23, 2012 at 5:42 PM

      @5:03.

      Delete
    4. Oh we know it is true. We dont need her to tell us so.

      What exactly were your stats? Can you prove they weren't altered?

      Instead of there being nothing to see here, we are popping popcorn to watch the whole ugly fight. There is plenty to see here.

      Delete
  23. Harlan the HarlanatorOctober 23, 2012 at 5:06 PM

    Did anyone else read the headline and pray that it was their school's CSO that admitted it?

    I did. Boo, my school where no one's come clean yet. Boo. Hiss.

    ReplyDelete
  24. At 5:03: go back to cite checking and bluebooking. You're so edgy.

    ReplyDelete
  25. Already, on PrawfsBlawg, online hub of the pro-scam law faculty, eqivocating nitwit Paul Horwitz of Alabama reminds us all that Grant's affidavit pertains to just one school during one single school year. He says: "Without seeking to minimize the allegation, I will note that it describes only conduct by one school in one year."

    http://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/

    Of course, the PrawfsBlawg audience knows how to read this sentence-- by omitting the word "Without".

    But how many admissions officers in the pre-Standard 509 era juiced the placement data or median LSAT numbers based on correctly interpreted hints, but not specific instructions from supervisors? I remember, from Iran-Contra, the technical phrase for higher-ups insolating themselves from responsibility in this fashion: plausible deniability.

    dybbuk

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Damme, that was cleverOctober 23, 2012 at 5:44 PM

      (The "read the sentence properly by omitting "Without".")

      Delete
    2. I'm renewing a comment I left on the last thread here:

      PrawfsBlawg currently has a thread going on for people applying to become law profs. People write in to say where they got callbacks or dings. "Skeptic" left a comment asking how these candidates justify teaching at schools that can't place students. I chimed in to support starting a thread to answer "Skeptic's" question. And . . . they deleted my comment.

      http://prawfsblawg.blogs.com/prawfsblawg/2012/10/law-school-hiring-2012-2013-thread-two-1/comments/page/2/#comments

      Delete
    3. It isn't one school:
      1. Illinois - known fraud
      2. Villanova - known fraud
      3. Emery - know fraud for undergrad that no on believes didn't include the law school.

      Then we have:
      all the schools who refused to admit they hired students to boost stats until forced to do so - fraud

      and dean Z lying through her teeth about the number of students who had been hired because...it was going to be available soon.. not because the admitted students would have been freaked out by the truth...very close to fraud but she seemed to skate by.

      This is not just one school in one year.

      Delete
    4. @Jonathan Crane -

      They had a piece on Legal Scholarship that tried to compare criticism of it to persecution and purges by the Nazis and in the Soviets - when I objected they edited the thread down many postings to just the posting that complemented the author! Orwellian huh!

      Delete
    5. @126:

      We also have Barry, Kansas, and Rutgers-Camden, the schools that underreported annual student debt.

      http://www.abajournal.com/news/article/law_schools_misreported_student_debt_figures_to_aba_us_news/

      It may be an "honest mistake," but I find it curious that these errors never go the other way. I would call this reckless fraud.

      Delete
    6. Probably not PosnerOctober 24, 2012 at 8:10 AM

      It's deeply disturbing that a blog that functions in part as a gateway for aspiring and new law profs unreasonably censors its comments in a way that alienates legal academia from its critics. So much for J.S. Mill, academic freedom, etc.

      Delete
  26. I like the email in ex. 4 where her boss tells her that "the numbers should be better than last year."

    Um, if you're just supposed to collect information and report, why are you suggesting the numbers "should" be one way or the other?

    And if this woman kept handwritten notes and emails this long she obviously thought something amiss that she could report later.

    ReplyDelete
  27. Just wait til Nando hears about this.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Better yet, wait until Leiter hears about this and REPORTS.

      Delete
  28. Not sure this improves TJSL's case:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H65nYMNRkjw

    "So now the faculty and staff are going to Bear Stearns," was said with no irony whatsoever.

    ReplyDelete
  29. Integrity, that's what every school must keep.

    ReplyDelete
  30. HEY ABA! WAKE THE FUCK UP! YOU FUCKING SUCK! YOU ARE A POOR EXCUSE FOR A REGULATORY AUTHORITY. FOR FUCKS SAKE YOU JUST ALLOWED INDIANA TECH TO BECOME A LAW SCHOOL. FUCKING CLOWN SHOW, BRO.

    ReplyDelete
  31. Although there is a lot of information included in this blog post, there there are still many questions left unanswered. One of them being exactly why did a lawyer who took the MPRE, and likely took classes in law school on professional responsibility feel it was okay to submit knowingly false reporting. Exactly what pushed her to this point in her life. Also missed is exactly why the law school administrators and teachers were so clueless about what happened--how could employment stats been so grossly overstated that no one at the law school questioned the stats. Also were the students also asleep at the wheel and did not understand how graduates a year or 2 before them had fared, and how awful employment was for them. Of course the ABA too fell asleep at the wheel all this time, but sadly such actions are becoming the new normal.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. She felt it was okay because she needed a job? What about the ethics of the admins who have an added responsibility to be sure that students get accurate data.

      I'm really sick of the professors from the last post and the administrators in this post acting like they have no moral obligation to provide their students with the truth.

      How do these professors who have taken ethics and are supposed to be mentors in a position of trust with their students so completely abandon their obligations?

      Whether or not they can be sued is not the entire point here. The point is also that they abused a position of trust and lead their students into a ruinous amount of debt.

      Delete
  32. So when can I sue Michigan State?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whenever you fell like it, Skippie.

      Delete
    2. Why not start with Illinois and Pless and Villinova? They've already admitted to manipulating stats. Is there someone else as well?

      I think they would be a ripe target for action.

      Delete
    3. They really have no defense to a fraud claim. They just blamed it on one guy - but there is no question they published false numbers that people relied upon.

      The students who had good stats and went there believing the medians should at least get refunds and some damages.

      Why start proving fraud from scratch when that element has already been decided?

      Delete
    4. I took my LSAT at DCL (now MSU) back in the old days in Detroit. There were prostitutes working outside the building as we all filed in for the test. That should have been the first clue....

      Delete
  33. Meow Meow says: The ABA, that is the American Bowling Association, would be better in determining this school's plight, and as far losing accreditation, it would never come to that because it will be reduced to as a matter involving clerical oversight or a record riddled with disputable testimony...or dream up a few more (any of them will work).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "The ABA, that is the American Bowling Association"

      No, I think you have the confused with the PBA, the Professional Bar Asshatsiation.

      Delete
  34. balkar saini lawyer services key objective is all about our Client satisfaction. Commitment to excellence, open communication, providing informed and well researched advice and working as a team with the clients are some of our core values which help balkar saini lawyer services to provide proper legal advice and services.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I've never understood why the term "disgruntled" is supposed to mean "without merit."

    A wife who divorces an abusive husband is disgruntled. A creditor who sues a debtor is disgruntled. Everyone who has to pursue a dispute all the way to a courtroom is disgruntled.

    The questions are "Why are they disgruntled?" and "What's the evidence?"

    Franky, I now assume that anybody who waives off a claimant as a "disgruntled employee" is in the wrong.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's really pretty Simple, Simon.

      It's not that the complainer is a disgruntled former employee.

      The allegation is that they are MERELY a disgruntled employee.

      Get it, Simon?

      Delete
  36. She can probably credibly claim she feared for her job and given the lack of enforcement or oversight from any outside source, she had no one to turn to.

    ReplyDelete
  37. And we're 0 for what in these class-action suits, BL and other law professor trolls (who, for obvious reasons, don't follow this blog)?

    Discovery is a beautiful thing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. My favorite parts of those cases is that the judges think the numbers were so ridiculous that no one would believe them.

      If you think these law suits and the exposure had nothing to do with the pressure on the ABA, you are wrong.

      These lawsuits are extremely important. My hope is that more plantiffs will come forward.

      Delete
  38. "How do these professors [like Campos and DJM]who have taken ethics and are supposed to be mentors in a position of trust with their students so completely abandon their obligations [and continue to benefit from the scam]?"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. To be a successful troll you really need to key your trolling to the post.

      Delete
    2. And also research prior comments to make sure your attempted flame is at least somewhat original, not merely a regurgitation of the same one used by dozens of previous aspiring trolls.

      Delete
    3. You are absolutely right! How dare law prof and djm know about the employment situations for grads and do nothing to inform them? How dare they abuse the trust if their students and pretend that everything is fine?

      How can they ignore their moral and ethical obligations to their students and not warn them of the potential to make life ruining decisions? Why aren't they out there publishing information informing their students of the dishonesty of employment figures schools have published for years? Why aren't they advocating for reform and more transparency?

      They should be like all the other professors who are concerned for the welfare of their students and are working to create change in their profession.



      Delete
    4. The above is sarcasm. For those who can't tell.

      Delete
  39. I was waiting for something like this to break. It is just the tip of the iceberg, and the law school's are sinking without DiCaprio there to save them.

    I think this type of unraveling is why the schools and friendly judges have worked so hard to dismiss these lawsuits outright -- discovery will devastate them.

    ReplyDelete
  40. I was waiting for something like this to break. It is just the tip of the iceberg, and the law school's are sinking without DiCaprio there to save them.

    I think this type of unraveling is why the schools and friendly judges have worked so hard to dismiss these lawsuits outright -- discovery will devastate them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Excellent point. Discovery must have these schools shaking.

      Notice they are already attacking her credibility instead of vigorously showing the proof that it isn't true.

      Delete
  41. I agree that discovery will not be a good thing, but what about their reputation and alumni pool?

    [1.] First, except for the abolute top 15%-20% of the T-14, they can't realistically think that anyone who graduated in the last five years will have anything positive to say about the school. Is that OK? Do they think that a whole generation of alumni who say "I won't donate until I pay off my loans" is a good thing?

    [2.] How can law schools in general (and TJSL in particular) say the employment stats aren't "important," and then have e-mails like the one included in the declaration, which makes it clear that the release of employment numbers are important enough to preclude staff from taking vacations.

    [3.] At what point does the government step up and stop this? It can't be that the breaking trend in education policy is funding eduction through non-recoverable student loans. That is not a viable policy.

    [4.] If the law schools keep lowering their admission standards, isn't that going to tar the reputation of entire classes from 2011 to 2016?

    I get that law schools are basically in denial now. But there are some real long term risks that will not go away, no matter how often Brian Lieter pooh-poohs other schools.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Also, if law schools claim employment stats "aren't important," why are they devoting resources to "fudging" them?

      Delete
    2. 1. They get their money from tuition so they don't care about donations.
      2. It's obviously two separate situations. One relates to a student's decision to attend law school and the other is a deadline associated with this person's job. That's not to say I agree employment stats aren't important though but you're making an incredibly poor comparison here.
      3. Insert law or legal in front of education. Don't assume the high cost of law school is a problem across the board.
      4. TTT's will always be TTT's.

      Delete
  42. If one lives long enough, one will live to see the rise and fall of celebrity and institutions:

    Michael Jackson: From hero to possible or rather probable child molester, and given a damn good and expensive funeral.

    Mel Gibson: Hero to drunk Racist and ruined.

    Michael (Kramer) Richards: Same as Mel Gibson?

    Marlon Brando and Lucille Ball: We'll forget about their rants.

    Lance Armstrong: Brought down as well it seems, and one has to wonder why it all took so long.

    Fatty Arbuckle: Ruined in Hollywood forever.

    As for the Law School Industrial Complex: It is teflon, and all of this will blow over, or it will be so drawn out and delayed it will be like the guy that admitted many years later that he was "Deepthroat" during Watergate, and then it becomes like: Who cares?

    In any event, the charges resulting from the issues raised in this post will never stick, and some lawyers will get paid for adjusting their underwear from time-to-time, and for shuffling the files around.

    But transparency is just one aspect of what "The Law School Scam" is supposed to be.

    And BTW, can someone by now draft a universally recognized definition for the term: Law school scam?

    T'would be an interesting read, and I'm sure that Brian Leiter would review the definition with a merry twinkle and a guffaw or two, being the jolly old soul that he is :)

    As far as I go, Leiter is much cooler than any rock and roll hero, and I wouldn't be altogether too unsurprised if Leiter let escape a chortle or two whilst reading aloud to a bemused audience of his Yale peers, the latest official draft of the definition of the law school scam, done in earnest by the morally upright and anon peanut gallery that regularly shows up in ILSS.





    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What is your point exactly?

      You think the next important step is to debate a definition? You must be an academic.:)

      Delete
    2. 11:47 - John, you promised you'd stay aware. Aren't you breaking a promise to your 12-step sponsor by posting here?

      Delete
  43. We have a Painter sighting at 11:47.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Dean Hasl says, "The law school stands behind the accuracy of the data that we submitted to the American Bar Association." But what Grant is talking about in her statement is the data submitted to NALP for their annual survey.

    The attitude among law schools at the time was that schools had no legal (or, apparently, ethical) obligation to follow NALP's rules. The ABA survey essentially just asked schools to regurgitate what they had given to NALP without troubling to define terms like "employment" or explicitly requiring adherence to any clear standards. So legalistically-minded law school admins used NALP to launder their employment stats.

    ReplyDelete
  45. @12:04PM

    No. That was Fatty Arbuckle, ruined in Hollywood.

    And where does Fatty Arbuckle go to get his reputation back?

    Oh yeah. OH YEAH! Peter Paul and Mary would jerk many a tear and say the answer is blowin' in the wind.

    But I say that THIS COUNTRY NEEDS TO CONVERT TO THE METRIC SYSTEM!!!!!!

    And just one more kind of thin and weak communication and question:

    What are Campos and DJM trying to accomplish? Do they have any stated aims or objectives, or have they stated them already?

    If so, shouldn't they place such reasons for blogging in big letters at the very top of this blog page?

    See what I am saying? Shouldn't this blog by now, after bragging about 2 million views, have a stated purpose or objective?

    Because without such a stated purpose, the critics of Campos and DJM, that say they are profiting from the very issues they denounce, are actually........

    quite........

    right..........









    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will not speak for Campos/DJM, but we have a lot in common with them. Here are our issues: http://lawschooltransparency.com/reform/issues

      Delete
  46. @2:09 - you are right.
    As one who had to sit through a semester with Campos talking about reality TV and the Simpsons (in a property class), I know firsthand how useless his classes are. He has been profiting from the scam for years and now is deemed a hero simply by posting a blog. He has tenure – he can’t be fired. But he can and does continue to profit from the very scam he speaks out against. A real hero would actually do something other than writing. Stand up at orientation and tell the 1L's to get out and follow them out the door. That would make him a hero in my view.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I had Campos for property. It was one of the three best classes I had in law school, and by far my best 1L class. I don't remember any references to reality tv although there may have been a Simpsons joke or two.

      Delete
  47. I don't think anyone gives a damn about your view.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Campos can't lead people out the door. You are an idiot.

    ReplyDelete
  49. No no. And God knows who or what the nature of the view that Lois Turner came out to respond to. Only time will tell.

    But damn I do not want to prod. And I do not want to set up any lives for a cycle of overall exposure to liability.

    USA Federally backed Student Loan Debt is no longer protected by any sort of statute of limitatons, and has no limitations for the taxpayer backed interest that is piled on for absolute post adolescent life and until the grave and end of story.

    Here is a very basic statement: "Going to College and Grad School will ruin you for life if you cannot pay cash up front for it."

    The student lending system was never friendly or altruistic and was always intended to destroy the poor people that could not afford to pay cash for higher ed.

    Is that an extreme statement? Maybe?


    ReplyDelete
  50. This "breaking news" is less of a smoking gun, and more of a weak fart.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dean Hasl, back for more?

      Delete
    2. The sanctions motion though - wow! It makes Thomas Jefferson School of Law seem like a gang of blithering incompetents.

      Delete
  51. Any law school admin staff want to be a federal qui tam whistleblower? Get up to 15% or more of the millions of dollars the federal government recoups from the federal loans.

    Too bad I can't solict for these clients her. THAT would be "unethical" rather than the fraudulent conduct of these law schools.

    ChicagoDePaul

    ReplyDelete
  52. So sad that there has not been a Wed post--scam has become a part of my daily regime :(

    ReplyDelete
  53. I just had a chance to look at this - and I have to say that the sanctions motion for discovery misconduct and spoilation looks crushing - this is the Thomas Jefferson School of Law - they are supposed to be teaching legal practice. Do they have any idea how seriously electronic documentation litigation holds are treated these days? The sanctions have been savage in cases of spoilation (admittedly the ones I know are mostly Federal). If this motion is remotely accurate then Thomas Jefferson School of Law has no business pretending to train lawyers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, it looks crushing - just so long as it's factual and they can get the judge to treat it seriously.

      Delete
  54. Im sure that I will regret asking, but MacK, can you elaborate on what a "electronic documentation litigation hold" is? Preferably in under 2,500 words.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Son, if you don't know, trust me, you don't want to know.

      p.s.-- Qualcomm v. Broadcom.

      Delete
  55. Isolated incident? Don´t believe so..

    ReplyDelete
  56. How administrative people can do this type of things...

    ReplyDelete
  57. How administrative people can do this type of things...

    ReplyDelete
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